Monday, July 17, 2017

200 Years of Jane Austen

I have absolutely no idea why I am writing this post — or more specifically, how. I have various things to get done tonight, a moderately full schedule the next three days, and I am going on a holiday from early Friday morning (I mean very early) until the end of July. But I suppose how is answered by the why.
The why is Jane Austen. And I make time for Jane Austen.

Jane Austen is my angel.*


Tomorrow is the two hundred year anniversary of her death. If you've read more than a couple posts on this blog you will no doubt be aware of the fact than I am a devotee of Miss Austen. So in remembrance of this dear lady I am posting some of my favorite quotes. Also, I encourage you to read this page on the Jane Austen Society of North America's website, filled with tributes to Jane.


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One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other. (Emma) Note: Jane Austen is so much in my blood that I say this quote often to myself but only recently realized she wrote it!





The one all of my family will recognize: Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery. I quit such odious subjects as quickly as I can... (Mansfield Park)

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Seven years would be insufficient to make some people acquainted with each other, and seven days are more than enough for others. (Sense and Sensibility)

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The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel must be intolerable stupid. (Northanger Abbey)




[She was] sore-footed and fatigued, restless and agitated, yet feeling, in spite of everything, that a ball was indeed delightful. (Mansfield Park)

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A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment. (Pride and Prejudice)



Esteem him! Like him! Cold-hearted Elinor! Oh! Worse than cold-hearted! Ashamed of being otherwise. Use those words again and I will leave the room this moment. (Sense and Sensibility)

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I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! (Pride and Prejudice)

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The best description of certain parties: Too numerous for intimacy, too small for variety. (Persuasion)



“Very true,” said Henry, “and this is a very nice day, and we are taking a very nice walk, and you are two very nice young ladies. Oh! It is a very nice word indeed! It does for everything. Originally perhaps it was applied only to express neatness, propriety, delicacy, or refinement — people were nice in their dress, in their sentiments, or their choice. But now every commendation on every subject is comprised in that one word.” (Northanger Abbey)

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A fondness for reading, properly directed, must be an education in itself. (Mansfield Park)

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And of course: It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man of fortune must be in want of a wife. (Pride and Prejudice)



She will never be forgotten. 

Cordially,
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*If you didn't get the joke, you obviously need to watch Bleak House. Not Jane Austen (Dickens) but still amazing. Review coming soon!
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1 comment:

  1. Oh Austen, how lovely she is.
    Are there different versions of Pride and Prejudice? Because I have heard people say "It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man of fortune must be in want of a wife. "
    But I have always believed it to be "It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife"

    Perhaps that is what happens when a book ends up in the public domain.

    When I first saw the S&S quotes, my first thought was "that's from our play". :)

    ReplyDelete

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